HEALTH RISKS | LINK FOUND BETWEEN RISING DAMP AND ASTHMA

HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH RISING DAMP

The presence of rising damp can cause serious health and safety concerns in both the workplace and the home. Excess moisture can in turn create factors that lead to an increase in the prevalence of serious respiratory illnesses and disorders such as asthma.

View the links below for further information about the relationship between rising damp and serious respiratory conditions such as asthma.

ASTHMA AUSTRALIA

MOULD
DAMP HOUSES and WORKPLACES can lead to the growth of moulds, which can cause a range of respiratory disorders. [...]

ABC RADIO

LINK FOUND BETWEEN RISING DAMP AND ASTHMA
The World Today – Monday, 7 June , 2004 12:38:00
Reporter: Tanya Nolan

“Asthma experts are concerned about increasing cases of rising damp in Australian homes and the risks that that poses to asthma sufferers. The Royal Australian Institute of Architects has conducted a nation-wide survey, revealing that South Australia has the highest number of homes affected by rising damp.

Australia has one of the highest asthma rates in the world with more than 2 million sufferers and the new results have prompted a health warning from Asthma Foundation of Victoria. [...]”

READ THE FULL TRANSCRIPT [...]

WIKIPEDIA

HEALTH EFFECTS OF STRUCTURAL DAMP
Asthma is one of the most common health effects associated with structural dampness. Asthma is heightened due to condensation, moisture, humidity, and water intrusion, which all contribute to indoor moisture. Mold infestation is a major trigger for asthma. Aside from asthma, other health concerns of mold are infections, allergenic or immunological illness, and nonallergic illness.[1] Asthma is also triggered by the sensitization of dust mites accruing humid, wet regions of a structure.[1] Another health effect associated with structural dampness is the presence of bacteria in an indoor environment. Bacteria requires water to grow and multiply. Bacteria is a source for the transmission of diseases, therefore putting occupants' health at risk by water intrusion into the indoor environment. Water removal and drying of wet building materials within 2 days will likely prevent mold and bacteria growth, therefore reducing occupants' vulnerability to disease.[2]

[1] Godish, Thad (2001). Indoor Environmental Quality. CRC Press. p. 178. ISBN 1-56670-402-2.
[2 ] Mold and Water Intrusion. Department of Environmental Health and Safety. University of Colorado at Boulder. Retrieved 17 November 2011.

FMTV | MOLDY

Moldy is a gripping documentary that explores toxic mold and how it has becoming a modern-day health problem of monumental proportions that affects us all. Moldy brings together the country's top medical experts with mold survivors, as we follow their stories of illness, treatment, and recovery. Learn to recognize the conditions necessary for mold to thrive, and how to navigate the murky waters of recovery of both home and health.

A VISUAL GUIDE TO DAMP, MOLD AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

Excess moisture leads – on almost all indoor materials – to growth of microbes such as moulds, fungi and bacteria, which subsequently emit spores, cells, fragments and volatile organic compounds into the indoor air. Moreover, dampness initiates chemical and/or biological degradation of materials, which also causes pollution of the indoor air. Exposure to microbial contaminants is clinically associated with respiratory symptoms, allergies, asthma and immunological reactions. Dampness has therefore been suggested to be a strong and consistent indicator of risk for asthma and respiratory symptoms such as coughing and wheezing.

Source: A Visual Guide to Damp. Crown Preservation, UK.

Definitions:
COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).
Ischaemic (or ischemic) heart disease is a disease characterized by reduced blood supply to the heart. It is the most common cause of death in most western countries. Ischaemia means a "reduced blood supply".